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GLENDOWAN SCHOOL 5K POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER

first_imgTHE GLENDOWAN National School fundraising 5k due to take place on Sunday morning has been postponed to a later date.Organisers of the fun run and walk say adverse weather conditions this weekend has forced them to call the event off.However it will be held at a later date.  GLENDOWAN SCHOOL 5K POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER was last modified: January 25th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:5kGlendowannational schoollast_img read more

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Rust-resistant soya for Africa

first_imgThe resistant cultivar, right, compared to rust-afflicted growth on the left. (Image: IITA) MEDIA CONTACTS Jeffrey OliverIITA corporate communications manager+234 2 241 2626 ext. 2773 USEFUL LINKS • Int’l Institute for Tropical Agriculture • National Cereal Research Institute • UN Food and Agriculture OrganisationRELATED ARTICLES• Super sorghum for Africa • Ethiopian wins World Food Prize • Uganda leads rice researchJanine ErasmusWest and Central African farmers will soon be able to enjoy better harvests thanks to the development and imminent distribution of a soya bean variety that resists the invasive and highly destructive Asian soya bean rust.The plant was developed at the Nigeria-based International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, with further assistance from the National Cereal Research Institute.It is the first rust-resistant soya bean variety to be made available for cultivation, and is due to be released soon in not only in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country, but also in other West and Central African countries.IITA pathologist Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, speaking to the Africa Science News Service in July 2009, said the new soya bean variety, known as TGx 1835-10E, has resistance genes that give it the edge against all types of rust fungus currently known in Nigeria.He also said that IITA has a back-up stock of several other resistant strains of soya beans, just in case the rust fungus adapts to TGx 1835-10E and the resistant soya bean succumbs.Seeds are expected to be available by the start of the 2010 sowing season at a nominal cost, making the new variety affordable for small farmers.Halting the spread of the fungal disease could literally mean the difference between life and death for many impoverished Africans who depend on soya production for their livelihoods.It is generally agreed that the most effective rust-control method is a combination of chemicals and the use of resistant soya bean strains. The latter have not been available until now, and chemicals are often unaffordable for African subsistence farmers.The new cultivar is not resistant to all fungal diseases, but it will go a long way towards providing peace of mind to those farmers whose entire income depends on the success of their crops.“It does give relief to farmers faced with the challenges of rust disease without any other solution,” commented Cereal Research Institute pathologist Olumide Shokalu.Disaster for farmersAsian soya bean rust originated in Japan in the early 20th century. There are several types which vary in virulence, but it is the most aggressive strain – caused by the Phakopsora pachyrhizi fungus – that is currently causing worldwide ruin.The disease means disaster for farmers, especially those working on a small scale, because the spread of its spores causes widespread defoliation and considerable yield loss – as much as 80%. And in countries which depend on agriculture for income, such as Nigeria where about 60% of Nigerians work in the agricultural sector, every plant counts.The disease is found in most soya bean growing areas of the world. While the parasite does need living tissue to survive, it is unfortunately compatible with over 90 other plant species, including commonly grown crops and weeds such as kudzu. This makes it even harder to eradicate.However, TGx 1835-10E offers hope for hard-pressed African farmers who do battle daily with plant diseases, wild animals that plunder their crops, and the unforgiving climate.The IITA says the new variety has the potential to significantly increase soya bean production in Africa’s high-risk areas. As well as being rust-resistant and early-maturing, TGx 1835-10E is also high-yielding. IITA data shows that it yielded an average of 1 655 kg/ha grain and 2 210 kg/ha fodder in field trials in Nigeria.The TGx 1835-10E breeding line was one of only three out of an initial 178 that excelled through successive rounds of testing in the field between 2002 and 2006.TGx 1835-10E received approval for general cultivation in Nigeria in December 2008 and was registered with the Nigerian National Variety Release Committee in June 2009.A worldwide curseThe P. pachyrhizi fungus arrived in Africa in 1996 and has spread rapidly across the continent, affecting countries including Uganda, Zambia, Rwanda, Nigeria, Mozambique and Cameroon. It was first reported in Nigeria in 1999 and in South Africa in 2001.The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation names Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda as the continent’s main soya bean growers. However, these countries have suffered devastating losses to the persistent pest.According to stopsoybeanrust.com, South Africa has reported yield losses between 10% and 80% in recent years. Neighbouring Zimbabwe has lost between 60% and 80% of commercial crops due to the fungal disease.Soya bean rust reached South America five years after its arrival in Africa, and has caused heavy losses there too. Brazil is reported to have lost US$2-billion (R16-billion) due to crop failure in 2003, although the country had spent $400-million (R3.2-billion) on fungicides.In September 2004, fungal spores borne on hurricane winds reached North America, via Louisiana. By then, the US was on the alert and had put into place a control strategy.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

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Billions for water infrastructure projects

first_img20 May 2011South Africa plans to spend over R14.2-billion over the next three years on dams and water distributions systems to ensure the country maintains a sustainable water supply, says Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa.The spending forms part of the government’s three-year, R846-billion infrastructure upgrade plan.Addressing members of Parliament in Cape Town this week, Molews said her department had spent R5.9-billion of the R29.2-billion budgeted for several projects, ranging from water services projects to mega infrastructure projects.“The spending focus over the medium term will be on bulk raw water resource infrastructure to meet sustainable demand for South Africa,” Molewa said, pointing out that the details are outlined in Vote 38 in the National Treasury’s Estimates of National Expenditure for 2011.Included in the R14.2-billion, the department would also spend R1.4-billion on small infrastructure projects, over R6.4-billion on regional bulk infrastructure and R730-million on water services projects.Mega-infrastructure projectsThe projects include R16-billion for the Olifants River Water Resource Development Project in Limpopo – which includes over R3-billion to be spent on the De Hoop Dam and a further R13.1-billion on distribution systems.So far over R2.5-billion has been spent on the project – the bulk (over R2.1-billion) on revamping the De Hoop Dam. A further R2.8-billion will be spent on the project over the next three years.The other mega-infrastructure projects the department is rolling out include:A R2.2-billion upgrade of Clanwilliam Dam (with R380-million to be spent over the next three years).The R2-billion Greater Letaba River Project which includes the Tzaneen and Nwamitwa dams (R386-million over the next three years).Phase one of the Mokolo and Crocodile River Augmentation Project (R603-million over the next three years).The R1.7-bn Nandoni Water Treatment Works and Distribution project (R753-million over the next three years).The Nandoni Pipeline project (R720-million over the next three years).Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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EPA releases RFS volume obligations

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released proposed 2018 Renewable Volume Obligations (RVOs) for the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). The total renewable fuel volume is proposed to be 19.24 billion gallons, while the proposed conventional biofuel amount of 15 billion gallons maintains the level set in the final RVOs for 2017. The proposal also calls for 4.24 billion gallons of advanced biofuel, including 238 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel.“We are pleased to see EPA pick up where last year’s RFS rulemaking left off and propose a rule that keeps the RFS on track for conventional ethanol production. EPA’s proposal is good for farmers who are facing tough economic times and good for consumers who want affordable fuel choices that give us a cleaner environment,” said Wesley Spurlock, president of the National Corn Growers Association. “The Renewable Fuel Standard has been a resounding success: cleaner air, greater energy independence, and stronger rural communities. We call on the EPA to keep the RFS moving forward in line with the law and in a timely manner. Doing so will bring greater stability and certainty to the marketplace and spur increased investment in renewable fuels.”The process will illustrate the Trump Administration’s level of support for renewable fuels.“The release of the proposed RVOs is the first real test of the current administration’s pledged support for renewable fuels, and we are encouraged to see the EPA demonstrate President Trump’s continued commitment to the Renewable Fuel Standard,” said Emily Skor, Growth Energy CEO. “While we are pleased with the EPA and Administration’s commitment to a 15-billion-gallon target for conventional biofuels, we would like to see final levels for cellulosic and advanced biofuels continue to give producers and stakeholders certainty in their investment in second generation technology.”last_img read more

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