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Wine, can it be in your New Year’s diet?

first_imgNewsWine, can it be in your New Year’s diet?By admin – January 19, 2012 551 Facebook Linkedin WhatsApp Email Twittercenter_img Print AS THE New Year kicks into gear and gets going lie 2012 should, we are all looking at ourselves and wishing for an overhaul. Many things will be cut, or at least we will give it a few weeks at least. Cigarettes, chocolate, snacks…… all the usual suspects and with the very best of intentions. And of course – alcohol. Who could forget our old friend that has become our close acquaintance over the last month or so what with the festive celebrations.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up But all in all, our new year’s resolution, young or old, male or female, is to look after ourselves better.  It will mean forming some sort of regime to kick start the new you and boot out some indulgent habits.Now, at this point, I will say that I have a few New Year’s food resolutions that I will be trying to adhere to. But, before I banish alcohol, and in this case wine, from my menu, there are a few things you should consider before taking such drastic measures. Reducing your intake of alcohol might certainly be in order, but there is a lot of medical evidence that shows that moderate alcohol can be part of a healthy diet. Even beyond the proven medical implications of wine consumption, there are several factors that argue in favour of incorporating wine into a reduced calorie diet! A recent online study indicated more and it started with tannins. They are one of the fundamental components of wine, and red wines in particular. They add structure to the wine giving wine that mouth puckering, drying quality. That puckering quality is the astringent action of the tannins on the lining of your mouth. It literally draws the skin tightly together.Now imagine what happens in your stomach when you enjoy a glass of wine before dinner. Those same tannins work their magic on the lining of the stomach, drawing it a little tighter and perhaps starting you on your way to fullness well before you’ve eaten your first bite.Eat slowerWe all know the saying that our eyes are bigger than our stomachs. Typically, it’s always said after an excessive meal, one in which we eat well past fullness because our bellies’ perception of fullness always seems to lag behind that of our mischievous minds. The key to helping those two levels of perception sync up is to slow down your eating. There are many ways to do that, from chewing thoroughly to having several small courses during a meal instead of one big one, but adding a glass of wine to your meal might help as well.Small indulgences will satisfyThink about it, a fantastic morsel of chocolate is much more satisfying than a brick of mediocre chocolate. A few thin slices of the best cured Parma will blow a stack of watery slices of ham out of the water when it comes to feeding your soul. We eat primarily to survive, though considering we are talking about going on a diet; it seems obvious we’ve gone past that point. Think of a small glass of good wine as the same.PairingYou might be surprised about mentioning that pairing wine with the food you eat is an important factor, but it is beneficial on two fronts. The first creates a result of hopefully using better, healthier ingredients while you cook. The second takes more effort on your part. It requires you to think more closely about what you put in your body, and not only the quality but the quantity of any given item you might be consuming as well.“Compared with non-drinkers, initially normal-weight women who consumed a light to moderate amount of alcohol gained less weight and had a lower risk of becoming overweight and/or obese during 12.9 years of follow-up.”Of course, there are many factors that might have influenced this conclusion. Interestingly, this seems to apply only to women and not to men, though apparently it has more to do with how men and women account for alcohol in their diet. It seems that women will tend to replace food calories with alcohol calories more than men, who simply add a few beers to their daily consumption. Advertisement Previous articleICO to premier John Kinsella’s ‘Tenth Symphony’Next articleSMILE despite proposed increases in landfill charges adminlast_img read more

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Press release: Full steam ahead for Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path

first_imgConstruction contracts are currently out to tender and the trail construction partners will be announced in the near future. The aim is to start work in the New Year and have the route fully reopened within two years.Highways England has committed a significant portion of the funding to allow this project to progress.Bruce Parker, Highways England’s head of planning and development for the North West, said: The funding is an important milestone in this complex project which has required significant work to get to this stage, and it is fitting that key funding partners and local users gathered to mark this development exactly three years since the fateful storm.Funding has been approved so far from Highways England and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Additionally, community fundraising by the Lake District Foundation has resulted in a £130,000 donation all which will enable the project to go ahead.Richard Leafe, Chief Executive of Lake District National Park, said: During Storm Desmond, on 5 December 2015, two bridges that cross the River Greta and around 200 metres of path were completely washed away during the worst floods the county has seen and Rawsome Bridge was also later closed to ensure public safety.Since then, the Lake District National Park has been working with key partners from the public and voluntary sectors on a plan to fully reconnect the route. As part of this work, a value for money study was undertaken and concluded that the restoration of the route could bring back about £2 million a year to the local economy.This next phase will ensure the entire route will be reconnected and can once again be enjoyed by the local community and visitors to the area.General enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. We ran a fundraising initiative this year and were completely blown away by the generosity of the local community and visitors to the area. We look forward to seeing the work start and progress over the next two years. Storm Desmond caused unprecedented amounts of damage to communities, trails and bridges across the national park. This particular trail offers a great family-friendly, traffic-free route from town to village, it will be fully accessible to many people, such as cyclists, walkers and runners. It has taken some time but we have always been fully committed to making sure that it is reconnected for the benefit of all. Local fundraising has played a huge part in ensuring that this project can go ahead, demonstrating the strength of public feeling about this important trail. We’re thrilled that we now have the money in place to allow work to go ahead to complete the full reconnection of the Keswick to Threlkeld trail and make the route more resilient along the way. Sarah Swindley, CEO, Lake District Foundation said: We’re delighted to be able to provide almost half the £7.9 million needed to restore and enhance the link between Keswick and Threlkeld, which was so badly damaged in Storm Desmond exactly three years ago and are looking forward to the re-construction work getting underway in the New Year. Highways England has set aside £250 million for projects like this focusing on supporting pedestrian, cyclist and other users of the road network. This money along with other special funds – for example supporting growth and housing and environmental improvements – is enabling us to provide environmental, social and economic benefits to the people, communities and businesses who live and work alongside our strategic road network.last_img read more

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Feghouli, Medjani out of Algeria Squad

first_imgMidfielder Sofiane Feghouli was a surprise omission as Algeria named their 23-man squad on Saturday for the Africa Cup of Nations finals in Gabon.Algeria, among the pre-tournament favourites, also left out Carl Medjani, who has been a consistent choice since his debut in 2010.Feghouli has featured in just seven league games for his club West Ham United this season and been the subject of speculation over a move back to France. The choices by coach George Leekens came after just one match in charge for the veteran Belgian trainer, appointed only last month after Algeria’s poor start to the 2018 World Cup qualification campaign.He included uncapped 21-year-old Rennes defender Ramy Bensebaini in his squad who will warm-up with two friendlies against Mauritania next week before heading to the tournament.Algeria open their tournament against Zimbabwe in Franceville on January 15 and also meet Tunisia and Senegal in Group B.Squad:Goalkeepers: Malik Asselah (JS Kabylie), Rais Mbolhi (Antalyaspor), Chemseddine Rahmani (MO Bejaia)Defenders: Hicham Belkaroui (Esperance), Mokhtar Belkhiter (Club Africain), Ramy Bensebaini (Stade Rennes), Mohamed Benyahia (USM Alger), Liassine Cadamuro (Servette Geneva), Faouzi Ghoulam (Napoli), Aissa Mandi (Real Betis), Mohamed Rabie Meftah (USM Alger), Djamel Mesbah (Crotone)Midfielders: Mehdi Abeid (Dijon), Nabil Bentaleb (Schalke 04), Yassine Brahimi (FC Porto), Rachid Ghezzal (Olympique Lyonnais), Adlene Guedioura (Watford), Saphir Taider (Bologna)Forwards: Baghdad Bounedjah (Al Sadd), Sofiane Hanni (Anderlecht), Riyad Mahrez, Islam Slimani (both Leicester City), El Arabi Soudani (Dinamo Zagreb).Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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