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Follow up on our yield guess based on planting by the moon in 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest If you’ll recall from last spring, we formulated a yield estimate based on the state’s planting progress according to the best phase of the moon to plant. According to two different almanacs, for planting corn in Ohio, the best days in 2015 were April 19, 20 and 23 through 25 and May 21, 22, and 28 through 31.Here is how the USDA crop progress numbers went for corn planting this spring:Week ending April 12: 1%Week ending April 19: 1%Week ending April 26: 2%Week ending May 3: 15%Week ending May 10: 55%Week ending May 17: 77%Week ending May 24: 87%Week ending May 31: 93%In April 1% of the corn crop was planted in the ideal time frame. In May 16% of the corn crop was planted at the best time. That is a total of 17% in the best conditions according to the moon. The most progress in a single week was 40% in the week ending May 10, which was the farthest removed single week from the optimal time — not good lunarally speaking.To get a yield estimate, we assigned a five-bushel bonus for corn planted at the ideal time and a five-bushel decrease for corn planted during the week ending May 10. We considered everything else to be trend line. Yield projections based on the Ohio trend line corn yield using USDA National Ag Statistic Service numbers estimate a yield of 163.1 bushels per acre in 2015.With this in mind, 17% of Ohio’s corn should have a five-bushel yield bump, 40% of the state’s corn should have a five-bushel yield penalty and 43% (the balance) should be trend line.So, here is the math:163.1 – 5 = 158.1 X 40 = 6,324163.1 + 5 = 168.1 X 17 = 2,857.7163.1 X 43 =                  +7,013.316,195 16,195/100 = 161.9 bushel corn average yield for Ohio according to the moon and some very unscientific assumptions.It should be noted that our moon-based calculation is considerably closer to the 153-bushel average state corn yield released by the USDA earlier this month than our August in field crop scouting estimate.last_img read more

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Love for sport urges Bindra to go for more

first_imgOne of the questions Abhinav Bindra gets asked a lot is, having achieved the pinnacle of his sport with Olympic and World Championship gold medals, how does he motivate himself to keep going?The answer, according to India’s first individual Olympic gold medallist, is love. “I love my sport, and I love struggle. Shooting is what I enjoy and cherish. That’s what keeps me going, and I’m looking forward to bettering my (Beijing Olympics) performance in London next year – both in the mental and physical aspects,” Bindra told MAIL TODAY on the sidelines of the India Today Youth Summit in the Capital.”The past cannot be transplanted into the future, so I always try and stay in the present. There are no glamorous shortcuts, no magic tricks for success; the magic pills you get are illegal and worthy of contempt. So I am prepared for another period of sweating hard for success. I am glad to take the plunge again.”Bindra’s current motivation is a far cry from his state of mind a couple of years ago, when he was contemplating giving up the sport. But slowly, he has worked his way out of that rut and into an attacking mindset again. He has found consistent improvement in his scores in each of the four ISSF World Cups this year, culminating in clinching the second Olympic quota spot for the country in the 10m air rifle event by qualifying for the final in Munich in July.If he keeps up his scores in the trials and international competitions, Bindra stands to compete in his fourth Olympic Games, having started his journey at Sydney in 2000.advertisementNine shooters have already booked berths for India at London 2012, and Bindra is proud of the team’s achievements in the last three years.”There has always been a lot of talent around, but now the interest in the sport is matching the talent. I believe we are now more driven and hungry for success. This is something that has developed over the years, and it really bodes well for our future,” Bindra said.Last week, when Shagun Chowdhary became the first woman shotgun shooter from India to book an Olympic berth, in women’s trap, she had hailed the example set by Bindra’s Beijing gold as a strong motivational factor. The 28-year-old Chandigarh lad said he was humbled, and would be glad to share his experiences with anyone who came to him for advice.”I am a competitor, and I have to be hungry all the time, but it certainly is a humbling experience for me to hear such things from my contemporaries. If somebody came to me to ask about my experiences in preparing for the Olympics, I would be delighted to share it with them.”I must say that of course I had my way of doing things, which were built around the sort of person I am. So no one should think that my way is the way, and no other way is possible. I do not have a secret recipe for anything,” he said.”I am an ordinary human being, I have no Midas touch. In air rifle shooting, the difference between coming first and 20th is hardly a few millimetres. I just attribute my success to three principles – focus, attitude and good old hard work, and that is how I intend to continue. I hope my best is yet to come.”Bindra is open to new ideas in a bid to optimise his preparations, and also advised youngsters to be willing to learn at all times. “I am open to new ideas, new technologies and new learning. When I learnt that my clothing impacts how I shoot, I went into details that would make a clothing technologist cringe. I am a shooter, but if someone tells me that I must understand how my brain works, I don’t dismiss it as psycho babble. I would do anything to be better than the rest,” Bindra said.last_img read more

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