Tag: 爱上海YG

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Eid Mubarak! Celebrating Islam’s Traditions at the Governor’s Residence

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter September 16, 2016 Governor’s Residence,  The Blog Muslims around the world yesterday marked the end of the Eid Al-Adha holiday or the “Feast of Sacrifice.” Considered Islam’s most sacred holiday, Eid al-Adha takes place each year on the 10th and final day of the Hajj, the celebration of the holy pilgrimage to Mecca, in the 12th month of the Islamic lunar calendar.As the sole Muslim member of the current Pennsylvania General Assembly, this year’s holiday was particularly special to me as I was honored to join Governor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf for the first-ever celebration of the Eid holiday at the Pennsylvania Governor’s Residence. We gathered with nearly two dozen members of the Muslim community across the Commonwealth to break bread together and discuss issues impacting Muslims in Pennsylvania and across the country. Honoring an ancient Eid tradition, the food that was shared during our gathering was divided into three parts – one third we consumed together, one third was shared with friends and family, and one third was given to those in need at Downtown Daily Bread in Harrisburg.Governor Wolf has long been a friend to the Muslim community in Pennsylvania and I know that his invitation to bring this tradition to the Governor’s Residence was inspired by his genuine desire to build partnerships and to be inclusive of all residents of the Commonwealth. It is my hope that we will all follow the Governor’s lead to welcome and learn from Pennsylvanians of all background and traditions.Eid Mubarak to all those celebrating this week! By: Jason Dawkins, State Representative Eid Mubarak! Celebrating Islam’s Traditions at the Governor’s Residence Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf   SHARE  TWEETlast_img read more

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Grades are important, so is mental health

first_imgDear Editor,Common Entrance results were released recently. We are once again in the periodical summer where an eleven or twelve-year-old may be ecstatic and zealous or unhappy and depressed.I’ve recently found out that for Common Entrance Examinations only 130 seats are available for Queen’s College (QC). That means that out of 14,000 students, only 130 students will get QC.That’s only 0.929 per cent. Let that sink in for a moment. Less than one per cent of students who wrote Common Entrance will get into QC. Harvard University does not have those odds, neither does Oxford nor Cambridge.When I was 11 years old, my parents worked with me throughout one year in order to prepare me for Common Entrance Examinations. My father and I, every night during the weekdays, would study Mathematics and English, and my mother and I on the weekends would do the other subjects. I had all the resources: the past papers, the textbooks, etc… I even went to one of the best private primary schools and I worked really hard. Despite all of that I did not get QC.I have done CXC, A-levels and written law exams and I have never been as nervous for any of those exams as I was for Common Entrance. I did not want to disappoint my parents nor family because I felt everyone wanted and expected that I would get QC. That’s a lot of pressure on any boy or girl.I, as an 11-year-old, felt that if I didn’t get QC it was the end of the world. My life was over! I thought that if I didn’t get QC, I wouldn’t be a good lawyer because my father went to QC and to be a good lawyer you need to go to QC. That’s the deductive reasoning of an eleven-year-old. Parents need to remind their children that if they don’t get QC, it’s not the end of the world. If they continue to work hard and stay disciplined, they will achieve great things.A vast number of professionals who are leaders in their respective fields did not get QC. I cannot list everyone because the number is so vast but I shall list a few. The former Chancellor of the Judiciary, Justice Carl Singh, did not get QC. The former Chief, Justice Ian Chang SC, did not get QC. Guyana’s only neurosurgeon, Dr Amarnauth Dukhi, did not get QC. Business tycoon Dr Yesu Persaud did not get QC.In light of what I mentioned, I wish to congratulate all of those students who did the Common Entrance Examinations and worked hard; and to encourage them to continue to work hard. If you didn’t get QC, it’s not the end of the world! Continue to work hard and be disciplined and you will do great in life!Yours sincerely,Mikel Puranlast_img read more

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Sugar production still lagging

first_imgDear Editor,The GAWU has continued to follow very closely and with great anxiety, the second sugar crop production. The Union learnt that as of October 24, production for the crop stood at 35,397 tonnes of sugar. Thus, the industry is required to produce 40,446 tonnes of sugar if it is to realise its target of 75,843 tonnes. Production at the individual estates was as follows:-With half of the scheduled crop weeks already completed, production at Albion, Blairmont and Uitvlugt estates stood at 43.3 per cent, 42.2 per cent and 64.9 per cent respectively of their crop target. Taking into account the remaining scheduled weeks, it appears to us that the industry will not be able to realise its set target. The GAWU, taking an average of the weekly production over the last five (5) weeks, when the estates operated normally, has determined production would be as follows:-We have also considered an extension of the crop until the third week of December 2019, assuming there is fair weather for production, and estimated production to reach as follows:-While, in all likelihood, the Corporation will extend its crop as far as practicable, our analysis, at this time, indicates that the extension will still result in a shortfall of the crop target.Information reaching the Union indicates that contrary to previous statements by the Corporation, the factories continue to experience difficulties. In fact, some officials in GuySuCo have shared with us that they cannot understand what is really taking place. The GAWU has learnt that the factories suffer breakdowns many times not too long after they would have undergone their weekly maintenance. It brings into question what is taking place at the level of the management of the industry’s factories. What’s even more disheartening is that the Corporation, in recent times, has bolstered its factory operations department, it appears, this unacceptable situation persists. It may well be the case of too many cooks spoiling the broth.The GAWU has been informed that factory breakdowns during the ongoing second crop totalled 495 hours as follows:-Albion – 253 hoursBlairmont – 96 hoursUitvlugt – 146 hoursWhile we expect the Corporation to tell us and the public that lack of investment is the main culprit, we, at the same time, must ask again what happened to the monies secured to re-capitalise the industry and to address the very issues that are popping up with too much regularity.If our information is correct, we also must be concerned about the approach of the management in addressing factory issues.We learnt that the workers of the Uitvlugt factory during the daytime hours on October 20 informed the management about a developing issue at the factory. The workers urged that production be stopped and the issue remedied. This suggestion was not considered. During the evening of October 20, with the issue becoming more pronounced, the workers again urged the management to stop the factory and allow the problem to be rectified. This request again was turned down. When the factory was finally stopped on October 21, it took nearly 24 hours for the problem to be remedied, at some cost to the Corporation. The workers shared with us that had the factory been stopped when the issue was first noticed, it would have taken a few hours at most to fix the issue and at far less cost and downtime.At Albion, too, we have learnt that one issue regarding the boilers had to be fixed twice in a short time. Workers shared with us that, on the first occasion, appropriate time was not allowed for the curing process that was required. As a result, the issue re-appeared in a week’s time and the factory had to be out of operation for nearly one (1) day. This is simply unacceptable and brings into obvious question the competence of some of the Corporation’s staffers.At the end of the day, the workers are the biggest victims. The Corporation, we understand, has generally been satisfied with worker turnout this crop. We also learnt that punt weights have generally been acceptable, except at Uitvlugt where some further checks are necessary. It, therefore, seems to indicate that the workers are fulfilling their obligations, yet the estates cannot achieve their weekly targets and are thus, denying workers their incentives. In some instances, estates have operated beyond their budgeted weekly production hours and yet the weekly targets are not realised. Definitely, and undoubtedly, something is wrong and is serving to daunt workers’ spirits who, at this time, are giving their best efforts.We urge the Corporation, to critically examine the situation obtaining in the factories. As President David Granger did say, during his recent visit to Albion Estate, “[w]e are not here to merely survive; we are here to thrive! We are here to guarantee employees’ livelihoods. We are here to guarantee sugar’s position in the national economy. We are here to safeguard the rural economy”. The GAWU believes, also at this time, that the Corporation needs to actively follow up the assurance given by Mr Granger as President since June, this year, that “…the $30 billion syndicated bond that has been secured by the Special Projects Unit (SPU) of the National Industrial and Commercial Investments Limited (NICIL) is transferred to GuySuCo within a short space of time so that urgent needs can be met”.Sincerely,Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU)last_img read more

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