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North Korea has Asia’s first outbreak of H7 avian flu

first_imgApril 5, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The strain of avian influenza responsible for the deaths of 219,000 poultry in North Korea is not the same as the lethal H5N1 strain many experts fear could cause a worldwide pandemic.Tests conducted by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have confirmed that the virus in North Korea is an H7 strain, although further subtyping has not been completed, according to an Associated Press (AP) story today.An FAO official said the discovery marks the first time an H7 outbreak has been identified in Asia, where H5N1 has caused poultry outbreaks in nine Asian countries and 50 human deaths in 3 countries since 2003.The FAO’s Hans Wagner traveled to North Korea when news of the outbreak surfaced in late March. “We have a new situation because H7 has so far not occurred in Asia,” Wagner told Reuters television in Beijing today, following his trip.”We want to know: How did it come to such a large farm with relatively good biosecuirty measures?” the AP quoted Wagner as saying. Three factory-style farms within 3 miles of Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, have been affected, news services said.Wagner described North Korean officials as “very cooperative” and said they had approved testing of bird samples by labs in China, Britain, and Australia, according to the AP.News of the outbreak has generated concern about its possible effects on North Korea’s poultry industry. The impoverished, secretive Communist state was thought to have about 25.5 million poultry in 2004, following a massive push to re-establish a local food supply. North Korea has seen widespread famine as a result of many factors, including natural disasters and bad harvests in the mid-1990s. The country has depended on foreign aid to feed its people.By North Korea’s official reckoning, famine has killed 200,000 people; international estimates range from 1.5 million to 3 million deaths, according to a 2000 estimate by the nonprofit group Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF).No human illness cases have been reported in connection with the North Korean outbreak, but H7 viruses have been known to spread from poultry to people before. A recent World Health Organization (WHO) report lists 93 human cases, including one death, as the result of H7 infections. All but four of these were linked with a major avian flu outbreak in the Netherlands in 2003.Although H7 viruses have made people ill, the cases have not been as severe as those in the current H5N1 outbreak in Southeast Asia. In most cases the symptoms, if any, were limited to conjunctivitis, according to the WHO. However, in the Dutch outbreak in 2003, a 57-year-old veterinarian died.Follow-up research on the Dutch outbreak suggested there were high rates of transmission of the virus from chickens to people and secondary transmission from person to person. At least 50% of people exposed to infected poultry in the outbreak were later found to have H7 antibodies, according to a 2004 report by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM).Further, 59% of people who hadn’t had contact with infected poultry but had household contact with an infected poultry worker had H7 antibodies, according to the RIVM. In all, researchers estimated that 1,000 to 2,000 people were infected with H7N7 in that outbreak, far more than the 89 cases officially reported.”This suggests that the population at risk for avian influenza was not limited to those with direct contact to infected poultry, and that person-to-person transmission may have occurred on a large scale,” the researchers concluded.Four H7 subtypes—H7N1, H7N4, H7N3, and H7N7—have been identified in highly pathogenic avian influenza poultry outbreaks, according to the WHO. It’s not yet clear which H7 subtype has sickened birds in North Korea. Further subtyping of the virus is pending, news services reported today.See also: WHO report “Avian Influenza: Assessing the Pandemic Threat”http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2005/WHO_CDS_2005.29.pdflast_img read more

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Boys Middle School SEI Basketball Tourney 1st Round Action

first_imgThe Seventh Grade Batesville Bulldogs Basketball team won their first round of the SEI Tournament Monday night against the Jac-Cen-Del Eagles by a score of 38-29.  The Bulldogs were led in scoring by Chris Lewis with 17, followed by Sam Johnson with 7, and Jack Grunkemeyer with 6.  Also scoring for Batesville were Gus Prickel with 5 and Conner Drake with 3.  The Bulldogs will be playing round 2 Tuesday night at South Ripley against St. Louis. Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Ben Pierson.Batesville’s 8th Grade Boys Basketball team dropped their final game of the season to Jac-Cen-Del by a final score of 38-28. The two traded baskets back and forth in the 1st quarter, highlighted by a buzzer beating 3 by Lyle Oesterling to put Batesville up 13-12 after 1. Despite shooting struggles most of the night, the Bulldogs were up 1 going into half with a score of 16-15. A Jac-Cen-Del 3rd Quarter that included three 3 pointers was the difference in the game. Bryson Bonelli led Batesville offensively with 10 points, followed by Jackson Renck (8), Lyle Oesterling (5), Grant Peters (3), and Cole Pride (2). The 8th grade team battled all night, but just fell short as they end the season at 3-13. Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Ben Pierson.The 7th Grade Cardinals defeated South Ripley in the first round of the Southeast Indiana tourney 35 to 25. Connor Miles scored 16, Carson Meyer had 6 points and 7 rebounds, Eli Weiler had 5 points, Hank Ritter had 3 points and 7 steals, Thomas Lohmueller and Preston Conway each had a pair and Evan Flaspohler had 1. The Cardinals advance to the semi final round playing Batesville at South Ripley Tuesday at 5:30.  Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Chad Miles.The St. Louis Cardinals 8th Grade Boys Basketball team defeated the South Ripley Raiders tonight in the first round of the SEI tournament by a score of 35-22. The Cardinals will be back in action tomorrow night in the second round of the SEI tournament facing the Jac Cen Del Eagles at the conclusion of the 7th grade game which begins at 5:30 pm at South Ripley. Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Ryan Schebler.last_img read more

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Shafer, Clawson discuss true freshman quarterbacks Long, Wolford

first_img Published on October 15, 2014 at 1:39 pm Contact Phil: [email protected] | @PhilDAbb As Syracuse and Wake Forest find themselves sitting near the bottom of the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference, they do so with true freshman quarterbacks currently leading their offenses.SU (2-4, 0-2 ACC) head coach Scott Shafer confirmed during the ACC coaches’ teleconference Wednesday morning that AJ Long will be his starting quarterback at Wake Forest (2-4, 0-2) on Saturday as sophomore Austin Wilson is recovering from an upper-body injury and Terrel Hunt is sidelined with a fractured fibula.“Pleased with his first output and looking forward to seeing how he can go against a very good Wake Forest defense,” Shafer said of Long. “When he’s on the move, he has good vision down the field and he can also still give us the designed quarterback run plays that cause defenses headaches.”In Long’s collegiate debut in Saturday’s loss to the reigning national champions, he impressed not only his coaches and teammates, but also his next opponent.Wake Forest head coach Dave Clawson said during the ACC coaches’ teleconference that Long has benefited from being surrounded by a veteran offensive line and added that WFU’s defense will have to key in on bringing Long down and not allowing him to extend plays with his feet.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“They’re plugging this guy in with a bunch of guys who have played a lot of football,” Clawson said.The Demon Deacons, coming off a bye week, start John Wolford, another true freshman signal-caller. To this point in the season, the Jacksonville, Florida native has completed 59.3 percent of his passes, averaging 177.2 yards per game and throwing six touchdowns to 11 interceptions.Clawson complimented Wolford’s poise and maturity, the stats indicate that he’s struggled to get Wake Forest’s offense — worst in the country in yards per game — off the ground.“I don’t think there’s a coach in the country who goes into a season and says, ‘Man, I hope we play a true freshman quarterback this year,’” Clawson said. “If you’re playing a true freshman quarterback, it’s because something went wrong.”Clawson said that against the Seminoles on Oct. 4, the Demon Deacons didn’t drop Wolford back to pass as much to avoid him taking unnecessary hits in what ended up being a 40-3 loss.“You’re not going to have the same playbook you’re going to have with a third-year sophomore or junior or fourth- or fifth-year senior,” Clawson said. “Every quarterback has a breaking point in terms of overload, giving them too much. And that breaking point with a freshman happens a lot quicker than it does with a veteran quarterback.“You have to be careful with what you put on those guys’ plates.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse strikes out on opportunities in sloppy 30-7 loss at Pittsburgh

first_img Published on November 22, 2014 at 6:48 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ PITTSBURGH — Syracuse’s first drive stalled after its banged-up offensive line allowed Pittsburgh defensive lineman Darryl Render to burst through the center and stop running back Prince-Tyson Gulley for a 7-yard loss. Its second possession ended on the first play after Gulley let the ball escape his grasp. An interception in the end zone dashed the third chance.In total, Syracuse’s first-half possessions ended in two punts, two interceptions, a fumble and a missed field goal. In a season defined by injuries and an anemic offense, the futility came to a boiling point in a scoreless first half.“We couldn’t sustain drives on offense,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said. “And when we did have a couple opportunities, we didn’t make plays.”And when Syracuse did find momentum — like a 75-yard touchdown drive to start the second half — it didn’t maintain it. The Orange (3-8, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) committed three turnovers, held the ball for only 21:18, and was methodically picked apart by Pittsburgh (5-6, 3-4) in a 30-7 loss to the Panthers on a freezing, rainy Saturday afternoon at Heinz Field in front of 32,549 fans.It was the fifth time this season that Syracuse has been held to one or fewer offensive touchdowns, and it continued a season-long pattern of inconsistency on that side of the ball.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was never a matter of rhythm, because we always had it,” freshman quarterback AJ Long said. “It was a matter of the offense, and us mentally shooting ourselves in the foot that stopped us today.”Syracuse stayed alive in a game it had no business being in. Kicker Chris Blewitt missed 41- and 45-yard field-goal attempts, wasting the Panthers’ possessions of 7:03 and 11:20, respectively.Pittsburgh’s ground-and-pound offense that had possession for nearly two-thirds of the game did little more than kill game clock, but still hurt any chance of SU getting an opportunity to string together some offense.“It’s a game of momentum,” Shafer said, “but it’s also a game of moving the football to get guys opportunities to get their wind back on the other side. And the whole thing plays together and if you don’t have momentum swings, it’s hard to get yourself in position to win a game.”On its third drive, Syracuse had seemingly stabilized an offense that had combined for a negative 4 yards in its first two drives. Long faked a jet sweep handoff to Gulley and fired a 28-yard pass to Devante McFarlane. Three plays later, Long hit Ben Lewis over the middle for a 14-yard connection.But on third-and-16, he lofted a pass to the corner of end zone that was intercepted by cornerback Lafayette Pitts.Syracuse still found hope when Long connected with freshman wide receiver Steve Ishmael on a 46-yard pass early in the second half. Six plays later, defensive lineman Ron Thompson scored his first career touchdown, moonlighting in SU’s backfield.In nearly every game this season, Syracuse has found itself on the cusp of second-half contention, only for its opponent to pull away. Against Louisville, a Cole Murphy field goal cut a deficit to six in an eventual 22-point defeat. A 14-9 second-half lead over North Carolina State turned into a 24-17 loss. When the Orange hosted Duke, a 10-10 fourth-quarter tie resulted in a 27-10 loss.And again on Saturday, when the momentum shifted Syracuse’s way, it too was only an aberration. The Panthers scored on their next three possessions after SU’s touchdown, and the Orange wouldn’t touch the red zone again.It was another empty performance in a lost season for the Orange.“We just really want to change this program around,” said Ishmael, who finished with 97 receiving yards on six receptions. “Tough loss, tough year, but sometimes people on teams do trials and tribulations not just to scour or anything, but to make them stronger as a team.” Commentslast_img read more

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