Month: January 2021

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Eddy Street development progresses

first_imgA year since Eddy Street Commons opened, nearly all of its storefronts and living options are filled. Five new businesses opened at Eddy Street Commons during the summer and three more are scheduled to open this fall, said Lori Wick, director of marketing for Kite Realty. “We had a lot of activity after May,” she said. Chris Jackowiak, property manager for The Foundry Lofts and Apartments, said the apartments are currently at 78 percent occupancy. “We just moved in approximately 83 residents within the last three weeks,” she said. “So it’s been very busy here.” Located directly south of campus at the corner of Angela Boulevard and Eddy Street, Eddy Street Commons offers shopping, dining and living spaces. It opened in the fall of 2009. Over the summer, AT&T, Kildare’s Irish Pub, The Mark Dine & Tap, Nicholas J Salon & Spa and Fairfield Inn and Suites began operation. Kilwin’s Chocolates & Ice Cream, Jamba Juice and Camellia Cosmetics are scheduled to open in the coming months, Wick said. Wick said Kildare’s, which opened on Aug. 5, has been very successful. It is a chain restaurant and pub, with other locations in Pennsylvania, Delaware and North Carolina. Kilwin’s Chocolates and Ice Cream, which should be open by late October or early November, will be next door to Kildare’s. According to Kilwin’s website, it is a franchise with locations in 14 other states and offers a variety of desserts. Another new dining option at Eddy Street Commons is the The Mark Dine & Tap, which opened in mid-August, Wick said. “[It is] an American diner with a vibrant, big city appeal,” Wick said. “The décor is just fabulous. It’s very high-end.” Nicholas J Salon & Spa, which opened on May 20, features Aveda products and offers haircuts, hair coloring and styling, nail treatment, wax treatment, make-up, skincare, massages and aromatherapy. It will have an interior door connecting it to Camellia Cosmetics, which should open by early September. Camellia, which also has a location in Granger, will feature popular cosmetic brands. The restaurants that opened in 2009, such as Chipotle, Hot Box Pizza and Five Guys Burgers and Fries, have already experienced popularity among Notre Dame students, Wick said. Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott, which Wick said is a limited service hotel with 119 guestrooms and suites, opened in June. “It’s beautiful inside,” she said. “Very convenient to campus.” Wick said more store openings would be announced in the coming months. Kite Realty Group is currently negotiating with retailers, but is not yet able to announce the names.   “We still have one building that we’re working on right now, and it’s the last building that is south of campus,” Wick said. “We hope to be able to announce something mid-October.” While many of the businesses at Eddy Street Commons appeal to students, it has a broader appeal to professors and professionals in the area, Jackowiak said. The lofts and apartments have residents of all ages. They are only available for occupants age 21 and over, and students can occupy a maximum of 20 percent of the apartments in each of the three buildings. “I would say the average age out of the entire property would be … maybe anywhere from 32 to 35,” she said. Jackowiak said the feedback from residents is very positive, and hoped to reach 85 to 90 percent occupancy by early October. In addition to apartment living, the Eddy Street Commons area has townhouses along Angela Boulevard. Ashley Bedell, project manager at Kite Realty Group, said these three-story row homes are selling well and new units are being built as they are sold. The new owners of these units include alumni, Notre Dame faculty and others. The homes are only up for sale, not for lease; therefore students are not living in them, she said. As for the future of Eddy Street Commons, Kite Realty Group will look to assess the market and the desires of customers and the University, Bedell said. “There is definite potential for phase two to extend south down Eddy Street, but that timing is completely unknown and those properties are not under control yet.”last_img read more

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SMC honors former student

first_imgOn Sunday, the legacy of former Saint Mary’s student Lizzy Seeberg was honored at a blessing and dedication of a memorial garden in her name. The ceremony was held in Riedinger Garden, and students, faculty and members of Seeberg’s family were in attendance. “These young people are always going to have a place to remember Lizzy,” her father, Tom Seeberg, said. “It gives us a neat little place. To me, she is everywhere, but it is nice to have little spots where you can just sit and reflect.” He said the family has thought about donating the bench for the past two years, but until now, the timing was never quite right. “We think this turned out to be perfect timing,” Tom Seeberg said. “It allowed time for life messages of Lizzy to sink in to her classmates. It worked out well because her friends who are now seniors can enjoy the spot for a couple of weeks and then her friends that are now juniors will have the spot for another year.” Junior Carolyn Backes, who was Seeberg’s roommate at the time of her death in September 2010, said this spot is symbolic of the strong commitment both the College and the family have to ensuring the legacy of her former roommate. “I think it was a big tragedy, but both the College and this family grew out of it,” Backes said. “It did affect a lot of people and was very sad, but it also amplified the College’s commitment to mental health awareness. We want to prevent things like this from happening again, but this spot helps us remember the good things about Lizzy. “Everyone is more aware of these real issues. Remembering Lizzy makes it real for us.” Backes said the spot is a place where those dealing with anxiety, depression or similar mental illnesses can go to reflect and “get away from all the little worries in life”. “Lizzy obviously struggled with anxiety and things,” Backes said. “I think this new bench and spot is such a serene place. It can be one of those places someone can go to think or to not think, deal with anxiety or really just calm down. “ Senior Megan Carey, a former friend of Lizzy’s, said this bench depicts the strong sisterhood that accompanies every Saint Mary’s Belle. “At Saint Mary’s we always say, ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle,’” Carey said. “Even though Lizzy had only been here for a little over two weeks ,she really embodied being a Smick chick.” During the memorial, Carey shared one of her favorite Lizzy memories. “One of my favorite stories of Lizzy is looking back at the first week of school when she marched into the bookstore and bought herself a French cross necklace,” Carey said. “She wanted to show the world how much she loved Saint Mary’s and how much it meant to her.” Carey said she is thankful Lizzy’s family has done so much to continue her legacy. “I think it is wonderful that her family created something at Saint Mary’s to remember her,” Carey said. “Even if someone didn’t know Lizzy, they could go to this spot and embrace its beauty.” Tom Seeberg said Lizzy had strong feelings of affection for the College, emphasizing how important it is for the family to have connections to the place she once called home. “Saint Mary’s has such fantastic women and we know that Lizzy knew she was in the right place,” Tom Seeberg said. “She loved this College.” He said this dedicated spot is a place where her peers could stop by for a moment and reflect on their short time with Lizzy. “It is a nice spot to just stop by for a moment,” Tom Seeberg said. “This is great because it can represent the moment she was in some of these girls’ lives.” It is important for the family to stay in touch with Lizzy’s classmates, he said. “We enjoy staying in touch with the young women Lizzy came to call her friends,” Tom Seeberg said. “As a parent the death of a child is different than coping with other deaths. You have hopes and dreams for your child and those dreams died. It is nice to see her friends go forth and pursue their dreams.” The College’s Student Government Association would like to continue to work with the family and raise more awareness about issues of mental illness, sexual assault, violence and stalking, Kat Sullivan, 2013-2014 class president, said. “This fall, we want to place a metal ribbon tree in the Student Center for victims and their loved ones to tie ribbons on it,” Sullivan said. “It will be a permanent, architectural display in the center of campus.” Carey said the College must continue to take steps to raise awareness of mental illness. “We should feel responsible as a College community to help our fellow sisters,” Carey said.last_img read more

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Indiana Gov. Holcomb, Republicans keep legislative control with big wins in state races

first_imgIndiana Governor Eric Holcomb was elected for a second term by a hefty margin as the Republican party swept the state to retain supermajority control of the state Senate and House of Representatives. Indiana, home to Vice President Mike Pence, was also one of the first states to go to President Donald Trump on election night, gaining him 11 electoral college votes.Holcomb won his reelection campaign defeating Democratic nominee Woodrow Myers and Libertarian Donald Rainwater. Holcomb first became the Republican nominee for governor in 2016 when former governor Mike Pence ran as Donald Trump’s vice president. The Associated Press called the gubernatorial race around 7 p.m. Tuesday night with 12 percent of the vote reported.Holcomb ran his reelection campaign on the promise to usher in a new era of record job commitments, record infrastructure investments and new career training opportunities. Holcomb succeeded to hold onto his supporters as the leader of the state’s coronavirus response despite some pushback on ongoing mask mandates.“Around here in Indiana… we don’t just dream big things. We do big things and we aspire to be a positive influence all along the way,” Holcomb said at a watch party with Republican supporters Tuesday night.Myers conceded to Holcomb and called him to congratulate the governor about an hour after the election was called. Myers thanked Hoosiers who supported him in a tweet shortly after.Sophomore Claire Kloska, a native of South Bend, said she was not “too surprised” Holcomb came out ahead.“Just because Indiana has had a Republican governor for the past 15 years and the general population tends to vote red, making it probably the most likely outcome,” Kloska said.Shelby Riehle, a sophomore from LaPorte, said she also was not surprised. Despite the disputes and concerns over the pandemic, Riehle said she thought conversations over the health crisis were productive.“I feel like both candidates addressed the virus considerably in their platforms,” Riehle said. “I am pleased and think [Holcomb] will continue to be a strong leader for our state.”In the general assembly, the GOP appeared as of late Tuesday night, to keep its lock on legislative control to hold onto its two-thirds majority in the House and the Senate.Though the Democratic party heavily focused its efforts on the contested attorney general seat, Republican candidate former Indiana Congressman Todd Rokita won with 60 percent of the vote against Democratic candidate former Evansville Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel.Tags: 2020 election, Attorney General, general assembly, Governor Holcomb, indianalast_img read more

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University trustee, benefactor Arthur Decio dies

first_imgArthur Decio, who has been a Notre Dame trustee since 1971, died Friday, according to a press release. He was 90.Before becoming a trustee, Decio was the chairman, president, director and chief executive officer of Skyline Corp. Skyline Corp. produces manufactured housing and recreational vehicles. The company was originally operated out of a welding garage in Elkhart, Indiana. Now, there are eight operating divisions in the nation.Decio donated money for the construction of Decio Faculty Hall and the Patricia George Decio Theatre in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. He also founded the University’s Cavanaugh Council and donated funds to the Snite Museum, Student Emergency Relief Fund, Ara Parseghian Medical Research Fund and Hesburgh Libraries.He received an honorary degree from Notre Dame in 1975 and also received honorary degrees from Hillsdale, Indiana State University, Purdue University, Saint Mary’s College, Vincennes University and Salem College.Decio was appointed by the president to three national commissions over the course of his life.University President Fr. John Jenkins expressed his condolences to Decio’s family and friends.“Art was a cherished, wise and generous friend of Notre Dame, and a dear friend to me personally,” Jenkins said. “He likewise lent his many talents to innumerable civic, religious, educational and humanitarian causes here in the South Bend-Elkhart region, statewide and nationally. My prayers are with his family and many friends as we mourn his passing while celebrating a life so very well lived.”Tags: Arthur Decio, Decio Family Hall, Patricia George Decio Theatrelast_img read more

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Senate passes two amendments to constitution, hears student union address

first_imgThe Notre Dame student senate gathered Thursday evening for their penultimate meeting of the semester to hear the State of the Student Union Address, given by senior and student body president Rachel Ingal and a joint presentation given by the Student Union Ethics Commission (SUEC) and the Committee on the Constitution (CC).Student government chief of staff and senior Aaron Benavides ran the meeting because Sarah Galbenski, senior and Student Body Vice President, could not attend. He began with a few executive announcements, the first of which was a reiteration of the message that Fr. Jenkins sent to students Thursday evening emphasizing the importance of following COVID-19 protocols for the rest of the semester. Fr. Jenkins also announced that dining halls will no longer be open for indoor dining.“Just please do your best to be as safe as possible,” Benavides said. “Things are pretty concerning right now with regards to COVID-19. As we face the Clemson gameday weekend, we all want to do our part to make sure we can make it through these next few weeks.”He also gave an update on the Academic Council, which finalized and unanimously approved the Title IX recommendations permanently during a meeting Wednesday.Ingal gave an update on a meeting Thursday with Campus Life Council (CLC). They discussed ways to encourage safe behavior at the Clemson game Saturday, the election and how to support students during this time. They also discussed mental health issues and how to carry forward the lessons they have learned this semester as spring semester approaches.“We’re trying to create some safe spaces and election-free zones so students who feel exhausted or burnt out by all of the political discourse have a place to go for their mental health,” Ingal said.Benavides also said the lottery for tickets to the rescheduled Town Hall on Trust with Pete Buttigieg will remain open until 5 p.m. on Friday.  There are already over 700 entries for around 100 seats available, so people who want to go should submit their name soon, Benavides said. The town hall will take place Monday at 7 p.m.Ingal then gave the State of the Student Union Address. She began with a heartfelt appeal to the difficulties students have faced this semester.“I know this year has been dynamic, frustrating and exhausting at times, but I first want to say that I am incredibly proud of the way that you all have continued to serve the student union in the midst of the chaos,” Ingal said.She acknowledged the senate’s steady service to their peers, although every student has had to face heavy emotional weight, she said.She said she has used the data from a survey taken by around 1,000 students work with provost Marie Lynn Miranda to modify the spring semester schedule in hopes of better addressing student concerns.Thomas Davis, a junior, led the presentation given by the SUEC and CC. He first reminded Senate members to complete their required GreeNDot training.The presentation mainly focused on issues with the constitution, namely with its length — currently 49 pages. The CC, Davis said, is looking to shorten that.The Senate also approved two amendments to the constitution, the first revising the Hall President’s Council (HPC) and the second revising the Student Union Board (SUB). Each amendment revised the bylaws, respectively of HPC and SUB, to more clearly reflect their internal procedures and operations.Tags: state of union, student senate, sub committeeslast_img read more

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Sheriff: 41 Vehicle Stops, Arrests And Summonses Issued During Holiday

first_imgMAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County’s Sheriff says 41 vehicle stops, arrest and summonses were issued part of the county’s STOP-DWI program on the Fourth of July.Sheriff Jim Quattrone in a media released Thursday says his office worked with municipal law enforcement agencies and the New York State Police during the effort.The Chautauqua County STOP-DWI Program is funded by drinking and driving fines collected from convicted drunk drivers; with additional funding from the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee.“Removing intoxicated drivers from Chautauqua County roadways is one of our top priorities,” said Quattrone in a statement. “If you choose to drink, don’t drive. Drunk drivers not only put themselves in danger, they threaten everyone who shares the road with them.” The program went from Friday, July 3, and continued through Monday, July 6. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Buffalo Bills Clinch First AFC East Title Since 1995

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Isaiah J. Downing / BuffaloBills.com. BUFFALO – Offense and defense shined for the Buffalo Bills, as they clinch the AFC East for the first time since 1995 with a 48-19 win over the Denver Broncos. Josh Allen threw two touchdowns in the first half and ran for another, and the defense got a score of its own to help Buffalo pick up the historic win in Denver, Colorado on Saturday.Buffalo started the scoring when Josh Allen connected with Dawson Knox late in the first quarter to give them a 7-0 lead.They extended that lead in the 2nd quarter when Allen carried it in himself on a 24-yard touchdown. It was Allen’s 25th career rushing TD, and it put the Bills in front 14-0.Allen followed that up with another touchdown pass, connecting with Jake Kumerow on a 22-yard strike.This was Kumerow’s first touchdown catch of the year, and he became the 13th player to catch a TD pass for the Bills this season.Buffalo’s defense allowed a Broncos touchdown late in the second to give the Bills a 21-13 halftime lead.That defense made up for it in the second half, though.After Allen scored again on a one-yard run, the defense forced a fumble from Drew Lock.Jerry Hughes scooped up the loose ball and returned it 21 yards for the score to make it 35-13.This was the second career touchdown for Hughes and his first since 2014.Buffalo only allowed one more touchdown on defense, and scored two field goals and one late touchdown run by Devin Singletary to secure the 48-19 win.Allen finished with 359 yards passing and two touchdowns through the air. He also ran for 33 yards and two touchdowns in the win.Buffalo’s record now sits at 11-3. They move on to face the New England Patriots in Foxboro next Sunday night at 8:20 p.m.last_img read more

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Jessie Buckley on Jumping from Reality TV to Being Romanced By Jude Law in London’s Henry V

first_img You’ve helped make your own luck by getting off the musicals treadmill to study at the prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Yes, I’d been busy after I’d Do Anything working at the Menier [in A Little Night Music], and I’d even been a jazz singer for a year, but something in me said, “Sod the lot” [to hell with it]. It was time to go back and properly train. So I ended up on the three-year course at RADA pretty clear as to what I wanted to get out of my training and streetwise as to what I wanted to achieve. I knew it was a risk, but I also knew it was something I had to do. Your role in Henry V is comparatively small, but your rapport with Jude Law makes a big impact. Thank you! I auditioned for the part last summer while I was doing The Tempest at the Globe, and I got the call the next day that I had it. Because Jude was in the room during the audition, I got a sense right away of how our onstage relationship might work; there was a great sense of fun from the get-go. Does your musical experience come in handy in performing Shakespeare? I suppose it does help me to the extent that the two [disciplines] don’t feel all that different. If anything, there is something quite musical in Shakespeare’s heightened use of language and the way he shapes his speech. How would you describe the wooing scene, which brings a bit of femininity to a very testosterone-charged play? What’s lovely is that Katherine is being used as a political pawn; she has heard a lot about this guy she hasn’t met, and when they come together she discovers a real longing for love and connection. I think what’s amazing, too, is that Shakespeare doesn’t just give you one set play about one thing. You never know which way the play might turn. Your scene brings a burst of romance into a play about heroism—or the lack thereof. Very much so: Katherine and Henry begin by playing games, or what I call a sort of verbal ping-pong, and fall in love by the end of the scene. Do you come from a family where language was valued? Very much so. My mum is a musician, so language has always been there for her, and my dad is a fantastic poet —not a professional one, but the way he uses language is really exciting. Language is so important to the Irish almost regardless of education. It’s amazing to think that Sean O’Casey didn’t learn to read until he was 12, but it’s as if it’s in your blood! [Laughs.] You didn’t picture yourself hopping from one West End musical to another? No, and I don’t think there’s anything on [in London musicals] at the moment that I feel terribly drawn to. That’s not to say I wouldn’t do a musical again. For me, it’s about the work itself, whether it’s interesting and who it happens to be with. I still can’t believe I came out of RADA early in order to play Miranda in The Tempest at Shakespeare’s Globe with Roger Allam as my dad. That was just bloody brilliant! View Commentscenter_img So, does the prime-time TV hoo-ha and buzz of I’d Do Anything feel like a lifetime ago? Totally! The show was amazing in that it got me to London and gave me experience, but it really does feel like a completely different me. What’s the same, I suppose, is that I know I have a lot to learn, and I’m going to make a lot of mistakes along the way. But that’s okay, isn’t it? Kidding aside, how valuable is it to work with someone who has combined film and theater, contemporary and classic roles? Jude is absolutely an inspiration, and I can’t say enough about how great and approachable he has been from day one. He’s a real leader—a true leading man—and that in itself has been fantastic to watch. I remember hearing that when Judi Dench was starting out at the Old Vic, she used to stand by the side of the stage watching the actors around her, and I can see why: That is where you really learn! Have you gone to Jude for career advice? Not really. I don’t think I would want to take up too much of his time with that sort of talk. The thing is, everyone’s journey [as an actor] is different, and so much of it has to do with people’s desires. And luck. And you get to snog Jude Law eight times a week. That in itself must make you the envy of all your girlfriends. [Laughs.] Um, yes, I think there are quite a few who are wishing they were in my shoes! Jessie Buckley was still a teenager when she made it to the finals of I’d Do Anything, the 2008 BBC reality TV competition to find a Nancy for the West End revival of Oliver! She didn’t get the role but went on to other musical gigs before taking time off to re-train as a classical performer. That explains why the 24-year-old Irish actress is currently charming audiences as French princess Katherine opposite Jude Law in Henry V at London’s Noel Coward Theatre. (Her director, Michael Grandage, spoke to Broadway.com of the “winning smile and immediate warmth” that helped her land the part.) The charming Buckley took time one recent evening to talk about the shift from singing to Shakespeare, and what it’s like to be wooed by an international movie star eight times a week. You’re Irish, playing a young French royal. That’s quite a leap in terms of accents! [Laughs] I know, especially since I’d only done a bit of A-level [high school] French. But once I got the part, I recorded some French people saying my lines, and I met a waitress in Brixton [south London] who was very helpful. I also watched a lot of Marion Cotillard on YouTube—interviews and the like—to see how the French hold themselves and how they speak.last_img read more

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What a Knockout! See Andy Karl’s Muscular Makeover for Rocky

first_img Star Files Andy Karl Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 17, 2014 Rocky Rocky headliner Andy Karl has obviously been eating his raw eggs and doing his pull-ups! Judging by this shirtless photo of the Broadway vet in Vogue, Karl is taking this whole Italian Stallion thing very seriously, and with the help of director Alex Timbers, he looks like he’s ready to rumble. He’s even got an “Eye of the Tiger” tattoo! Featuring music by Stephen Flaherty, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and a book by Thomas Meehan and Sylvester Stallone, Rocky is a new musical adaptation of the beloved boxing movie of the same name. Check out this Hot Shot of Timbers and Karl (or as we like to call it, Rocky’s one-two punch), then catch the production beginning February 11 at the Winter Garden Theatre! View Commentslast_img read more

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Christine Dwyer on Her Idina Obsession, Wicked Fans & Paying the Rent

first_img “After the Rent tour I worked at a bar. I folded clothes. I did odd jobs for years to make rent and sang in concerts for no money. I knew it would be difficult, but this is the career I dreamt about, and it’s pretty crazy to me that I’m actually here.” Hometown: Lynnfield, MA “My dad found an old photo of me in a witch costume and put it on a coffee mug with my Elphaba press shot. It says, ‘Our daughter had a dream…and it came true.’ I cried!” from $95.00 “Wicked fans are awesome. On opening night, my dressing room looked like a florist shop, and so many were from fans [known as “Dwyers Flyers”]. They’re always there to lift you up.” Wicked “Performing for autistic children was one of the most moving experiences of my life. The lights were up and the sound was lowered; we could see people laughing and singing along. They understood the story in a way most audiences don’t.” Star Files “Idina Menzel was my idol growing up. She has a low, raspy voice like mine! When I heard Rent for the first time, I thought, ‘This is a show I could be in.’ Then I saw her in Wicked, and I burst into tears because she was such a huge influence on me.”center_img Stage Cred: Two years in Wicked’s second national tour, working her way up from ensemble to Elphie, plus a stint on the road as Maureen in Rent. “I sang ‘The Wizard and I’ for a jury of my teachers [at Hartt School of Music in Connecticut] at the end of my sophomore year. I had worked on the song for a year, and that’s when I realized I might have the range to play Elphaba someday.” Age: 28 Related Shows Current Role: A soaring Broadway debut as “passionate, caring” green witch Elphaba in the megahit musical Wicked. View Comments Christine Dwyerlast_img read more

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