Month: July 2019

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City College Students Faculty Demand Fair Wages in DayLong Strike

first_img 0% Tags: City College of San Francisco • Colleges • protests Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Administrators’ offer of a 7.19 percent salary boost over two years has been denied by the teacher’s union, who say that the raise is “not actually a raise” and comes with stipulations. “Of the 7 percent, 3.7 percent would [restore] salaires to what they were in 2007,” explained Killikelly. Of the other 3.5 percent, only 1.5 percent “is a real raise,” he said – two percent of the remaining increase would only kick in if the school’s enrollment bounces back.Since the School’s accreditation crisis, enrollment has dropped from 100,000 to some 65,000 students.“The college has to grow back by a third of what it is now by the end of next year,” said Killikelly. “If not, that money goes away. It’s not really a raise.”The union is asking for the school’s teachers to be paid 4 percent of the cost of living adjustment over the last four years, which Killikelly said is “consistent with other union contracts.”“We want our salaires restored,” he said.Now retired, Nicole Wendel taught English as a Second Language classes at City College for more than 30 years. She said that teachers currently working at the school have been out of contract for the past 10 months and are experiencing “a lot of bottled up frustration.”“[Prop. 30 was] passed but classes are still being cut and we are not seeing that money go into [teachers’] salaries,” said Wendel.  “This is an unbelievably fabulous school. They’ve got to pay a decent living wage to those who made it that.” Wendel and other strikers said that the faculty’s current pay matches their salaries in 2007.The proposition was passed to prevent classes from being cut and provide more funding to schools, but the striking teachers say that they have not shared “a piece of the pie.” Instead, college administrators have proposed to cut classes by 26 percent over a period of six years, said Killikelly.“The people who are running the college have a bad vision of what they want for the school,” he said. “Instead of coming out of an accreditation crisis [with a vision to] restore the schools and retain teachers, what are we going to be left with is 26 percent smaller college.”Photo by Laura WaxmannWendel and others participating in the day-long strike, which affected 11 campuses citywide, expressed their frustrations with the school’s leadership following the accreditation crisis.California law requires colleges to be accredited in order to receive federal funding. City College, California’s largest public school, found its accreditation threatened in 2012 when a review by an accrediting commission declared that the school was falling short on several requirements. ”We used to say that we had the best job, but these last years have been hell,” said Jennifer Irvine, who has taught English as a Second Language at City College for over a decade. “I don’t want to leave my students, but this hasn’t been a happy place to work.” Many teachers have moved out of San Francisco altogether — or taken on multiple jobs — because of their classification as part-time employees, their meager salaries, and their often limited working hours.“This is the most expensive city in the world,” said protester Rita Moran, an ESL teacher at the school. “[This strike] is about retaining the teachers. How can we attract the best teachers if we don’t pay them something they can live on?”Unable to enter the school’s building, the group of protesters took to the street despite periodic downpours of rain during the union’s first strike at the Mission campus.  The strikers lifted signs into the air that read “Our Future Depends On City College” and “Educate Our City, Pay Our Teachers,” and maintained warm spirits throughout the morning protest, enlivened with a show of support from honking cars that passed the them on Valencia Street. Following the three-hour strike, protesters moved on to City Hall for an 11 a.m. press conference regarding their demands. Among other programs, City College offers special career-oriented programs for non-native English speakers, the formerly incarcerated, and for seniors, and many students showed up in strong support of their teachers, backing their demands for fair pay.“This school did a lot for the city and for immigrants, it’s where I learned to speak English,” said Anastasia Bachykala, who is from Belarus. Bachykala said she now works in graphic design, a career that her 5-year education at City College prepared her for.  “CCSF is the only school in the city that makes a professional future possible for low-income, foreign students,” said Bachykala. “These teachers are extremely professional and they deserve to be paid for their work.” center_img Some 25 teachers and students gathered on Wednesday morning at the Mission District Campus of City College to denounce unfair labor practices at the community college stemming from low wages paid to teachers.The chants of students and faculty members could be heard down the block from the Valencia Street campus, as protesters attempted to enter the campus but found that the school had been locked. “They shut down the school because they didn’t want to face us,” said Tim Killikelly, president of the American Federation of Teachers 2121, the faculty union that carried out the strike. The union has been involved in contract negotiations over teacher wages with Susan Lamb, the school’s interim chancellor, and the current administration for more than a year. Earlier this month, Lamb released a contract proposal without the involvement of the union. The move has been deemed as an unfair labor practice by the union, prompting the strike.last_img read more

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Neighbors and Nuns Face Off Over Soup Kitchen

first_imgBut neighborhood opposition – primarily from other residents in the building – has stalled the soup kitchen from opening shop. On Monday night, they attended a meeting at a studio on 15th Street to form a neighborhood organization to clean up the Mission.Presley told the neighbors that he coordinated a meeting on December 20 with the Mission’s newly elected supervisor Hillary Ronen, who will take office in January, and Jeff Kositsky, head of the Department on Homelessness and Supportive Housing, the agency heading the homeless encampment resolution efforts in the Mission. Neighbors would then have a chance to confront leaders with their concerns directly. Gianina Serrano owns the confection shop Sixth Course, around the corner from the proposed soup kitchen and downstairs from Monday night’s meeting. She said that when she was approached last week by the nuns she supported their mission, and then invited them to the meeting. The nuns are gathering signatures from local residents and businesses in support of their soup kitchen, which will be considered by the Planning Commission at a hearing next month. The soup kitchen, they said, is about taking care of the community.“We don’t just feed the homeless – we feed low-income people, a family who is out of money at the end of the month,” said Sister Marie Benedicte. “If you provide them with food, maybe they can pay their rent, and they don’t arrive on the streets.”The nuns listened intently as many neighbors wondered if a soup kitchen in the area would not only further lessen their quality of life by attracting more loitering to the already crime-ridden 16th and Mission street intersection, but also decrease property values in the area.“We have invested our life’s saving in an apartment in this building,” said a resident of  1930 Mission St.  “I have a hard time imagining that if we want to sell, we wouldn’t be losing a large amount of money.”“Even though the soup kitchen is having a positive effect on the community, it’s just not an attractive business for the building,” the man added. Since August, various city departments have collaborated in a concerted effort to clear the Mission of its sprawling homeless encampments – one by one, many tents have been dismantled and their inhabitants moved into temporary shelters. But Presley and others say they have seen little progress. Rather, the grime and crime has been pushed to their doorsteps, they said. Now, the neighbors plan to form a neighborhood association of sorts, to press city leaders to take action.“If anything, things are worsening,” said a neighbor who gave his name as Jeffrey. “I’d really like to know, how can we track the progress […] and who should we hold accountable throughout this process?”“David Campos said in September that every tent would be gone in December,” said Presley, referring to a promise made by the Mission’s supervisor.  Another resident, who gave his name as George, speculated that the Mission, in contrast to other neighborhoods, is a “containing ground” where street camping and criminal activity, to some extent, are tolerated. Many of those present at the meeting said that they were not there to vilify the homeless. Rather, they complained of services being cut, a lack of shelter beds, as well as rampant drug use, feces and criminal activity on local sidewalks.Neighbor Kelly Alberta said she has been confronted at knife-point close to her home, and criticized a laissez-faire approach by police when it comes to tackling crime in the area. “You have to wait for something to happen in order for somebody [to do something about it] – that’s troubling and that’s an issue.”“We don’t want an attack on homelessness,” said Serrano. “I’ve seen it my whole life. I just want the city to help address this issue directly and do more of what needs to be done to really remedy the situation.”After hearing their concerns, Sister Marie Benedicte pressed the neighbors to lead with compassion when addressing the homeless and disadvantaged in their neighborhood.“When you love people, they change their ways,” she said. “If you reject them, that makes the situation worse,” she said. Though some neighbors left before the meeting concluded, others said that the sister’s benevolence had swayed them to try a new, more compassionate approach to tackling homelessness.“I was skeptical of the soup kitchen,” said neighbor Travis Bonnheim, adding that after hearing the nuns’ testimony, he is “fully supportive now.” Tags: homeless Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Residents in the northeastern Mission District are forming a community group to push local government toward ending homeless encampments in the area, while a pair of nuns displaced from the Tenderloin tries to gather support for a soup kitchen in the neighborhood that neighbors fear will only attract more homeless.The nuns are Marie Benedicte and Marie Valerie of the Fraternite Notre Dame Mary of Nazareth, and their appearance surprised even Andrew Presley, a resident of Natoma Street and one of the organizers of a neighborhood meeting on Monday night. After facing a 60 percent rent increase last February at the Turk Street soup kitchen that the nuns operated for eight years, multimillionaire life-coach Tony Robbins stepped in to help, buying the ground-floor unit of a condo building at 1930 Mission St., located next door to the Navigation Center, a transitional shelter for the homeless. There, the nuns had planned to open a new soup kitchen to serve the neighborhood’s low-income residents.center_img 0%last_img read more

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Meet the man who says he can fix Muni For real

first_img“Dude, do you know how much those things cost me? Apiece?” This is a de facto rhetorical question from Mike Cheney. Most are. He immediately answers it. “Eleven bucks! Eleven!” That’s a fair amount of money to spend for a retired Muni diesel mechanic with multiple grandchildren — but if it leads to one of this city’s most intractable problems being solved, it’ll be worth it. ‘Retired civil servant’ Mike Cheney’s plan is so not-crazy, it just might work Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter So, that’s why Cheney prepared a comprehensive “2018 Proposal To Re-align Muni Goals & Operations,” printed up a handful of $11-a-pop copies, and hand-delivered a few of the svelte, 21-page booklets to the office of Mayor London Breed. That’s her quote right on the cover: “Muni has to work well for the people of San Francisco, so that it is their first option.”Right now, Muni is hovering closer to the option of last resort. During the two-month closure of the Twin Peaks tunnel, the agency hapazardly plucked buses and drivers off core routes to patch the hole in its system, creating gaping service cuts on some of Muni’s busiest lines. And, compounding this fiasco, it did this without informing the riding public or even the office of the mayor.Hand-delivering a transit manifesto to City Hall Room 200 — after copious emails dutifully signed “Michael B. Cheney, retired civil servant” — is behavior that could be taken as a bit, shall we say, eccentric. It’s the sort of thing befitting folks who rail at the Board of Supervisors during public comment about vast conspiracies being perpetrated by the administrators of the Recreation and Park Department. Or sing. Cheney is not that kind of person. Over the course of three decades and change working in, on, or under San Francisco buses, he earned a reputation as a man not only obsessed with fixing Muni vehicles, but fixing Muni itself. As a serial whistleblower, he broke up overtime payment schemes, and exposed and helped curtail numerous instances in which the health and well-being of workers, riders, and the general public were being compromised. He’s complained to management. He’s complained to the press. He’s even complained to the FBI. And, sometimes, after years of effort, things even got fixed.Mayors come and mayors go, but sclerotic Muni practices are forever. But now Cheney is hoping that this mayor will change all that. Many of the suggestions in his proposal are, in fact, recycled from proposals he made years or even decades ago — suggestions generated and/or ratified by experts and/or city number-crunchers many times over. But hope, like Muni wait times of late, springs eternal. “There is no statute of limitations,” Cheney says, “on good ideas.”Mike Cheney, as he appeared in a 1988 Examiner article titled “Pit Bull Hounds Muni Management.”One of Cheney’s first suggestions on how to improve Muni performance is a populist’s dream: Muni managers will surrender their car keys: “All official Muni travels to be done using mass transit. Personnel will keep log books noting each trip, equipment numbers, routes & time, writing down any defects or needed changes.” That’s the kind of suggestion that’ll be appreciated by barstool Muni critics everywhere. But Cheney’s 21-page missive goes far deeper than that. To wit: What if it turned out Muni could speed up buses and trains — and wouldn’t even need to buy new equipment, tear up the streets, or even eliminate stops? Well, it can. It could install skip-stop route schedules. This is a system in which Bus A picks up passengers at Stops 1, 3, 5, 7 and so on and Bus B picks up passengers at Stops 2, 4, 6, and 8. This has worked all around the world; it increases capacity and speeds up service. All the way back in 2005, Muni proposed using skip-stopping on Geary Boulevard for a Bus Rapid Transit line: “For the purposes of this analysis, Geary BRT service was designed as a skip-stop service, with ‘A’ and ‘B’ buses each stopping at every other stop, except at major transfer points.” Thirteen years ago, Muni predicted that “given adequate funding and no community opposition,” the Geary BRT could be “designed and constructed in five to seven years.” It’s still years away, at best. Well, that didn’t work out. But skip-stop could still work out. Would still work out, Cheney claims. He is its greatest evangelist. He explained it to the Hearst Examiner’s Rob Morse in 1998. He explained it to me in 2013. “You take the bumpers out of a pinball machine, the ball gets to the bottom faster, right? It’s just physics, dude,” is how he put it five years ago. “You see that bus?” he said, pointing at a packed No. 28. “There’s people hanging out the windows. Because they’re stopping at every stop. You don’t need to stop at every stop!”  Vastly improving transit service — and doing so on the cheap — would seem to be the end goal of every transit agency. But that’s not how things roll in the real world. Muni’s status quo isn’t working out for San Francisco or transit riders or San Francisco’s transit riders. But it is working out well for someone. There is, Cheney is wont to say, a lot of money to be made in running a transit system badly.That’s why, when queried just what reason Muni has for avoiding skip-stop busing, Cheney replies, “because it’d work.”By December or January, the Budget Analyst aims to complete an audit of Muni it was tasked to do earlier this year by Supervisor Jane Kim. It will focus on the agency’s decline in revenue over recent years and its epic, ongoing struggles with congestion management (Muni is the slowest transit service in North America. It doesn’t just feel that way, it really is). That promises to be revelatory. But, then, so was this 1996 audit — and, Cheney quips, that 237-page tome has served as little more than an expensive doorstop for our transit agency; many of his present-day suggestions are culled right from it. Maybe this time, he hopes, it won’t take 22 years for the city to not do the common-sense suggestions we paid experts hundreds of thousands of dollars to tell us to do. Cheney remains hopeful. He remains positive. Because, as he notes, there is no statute of limitations on good ideas.  Or, as Muni has amply proven, on bad ones either. You can read Cheney’s “2018 Proposal To Re-align Muni Goals & Operations” here.Photo of towed Muni bus by Aaron Kitashima Email Addresslast_img read more

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SAINTS will have a large travelling contingent beh

first_imgSAINTS will have a large travelling contingent behind them on Saturday as they bid to put themselves just 80 minutes away from Old Trafford.They travel to Warrington Wolves in the Qualifying Play Off, 6pm, and tickets are still on sale for the clash.Saints are the only team to beat Warrington on their own patch this season and head into the game full of confidence after beating Wigan.And with Paul Wellens, Francis Meli and Paul Clough signing new deals and Alex Walmsley agreeing to join the club next season, there’s no doubting the air of optimism.You can buy yours from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park until 3pm Saturday.Prices are:West Stand Terrace: Adult £18.50 Concessions and Students £12.50 Juniors £5Limited North Stand (seating): Adult £26.50 Concession and Student £18 and Juniors £5Please note matchday prices increase by £1.50 on the day of the game.last_img read more

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THE latest Saints Business Networking Player of th

first_imgTHE latest Saints Business Networking Player of the Month event – sponsored by Oval Broking Insurance Ltd – met for the third time recently with Jordan Turner scooping his second award.Jonny Lomax collecting the accolade on the centre’s behalf.As well as a chance to interact with businesses from around the area the delegates also enjoyed a presentation from Rugby League World Cup Marketing Manager Mark Forster on how this year’s tournament will be a great opportunity for all.Saints Head of Sales and Marketing, Dave Hutchinson, said: “The event is continuing to go from strength to strength and it is encouraging to see that so many businesses in the region see it as an important part of their networking and business development opportunity.“Mark Forster delivered an excellent presentation on the Rugby League World Cup and we have many more interesting sessions to follow in the coming months.“Our next event will be on Friday May 24 and for further information please do not hesitate to contact me on sales@saintsrlfc.com or call 01744 455061.”last_img read more

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ANOTHER bumper Saints InTouch Podcast is now avail

first_imgANOTHER bumper Saints InTouch Podcast is now available to download! It’s been a busy week at Saints with Jonny Lomax signing a new four-year deal and the club throwing their weight behind the new TV deal and restructure. In this week’s Podcast you can hear the thoughts of the full back alongside Club Chairman Eamonn McManus. Also featured are James Roby, Adam Swift and Nathan Brown. The weekly Podcast is the ideal way to keep up to date with the Saints and the perfect length for your commute too! To listen click here or search for St Helens RFC on iTunes. You can also hear past episodes there too. Remember if you want a question answering on the Podcast drop us a line @saints1890 on twitter or email podcast@saintsrlfc.comlast_img read more

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They will take on York City Knights in the first r

first_imgThey will take on York City Knights in the first round of the 2018 Women’s Betfred Super League competition.Entry to the game is priced at just £2 for adults and FREE for under 16s.Women’s Head Coach Mark Brennan will name his squad for the game later in the week so check back for further updates.last_img

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I wasnt out of breath but the players sure were

first_img“I wasn’t out of breath but the players sure were,” he said. “It was a great game, just exactly how I expected it to be. I just knew it would be a tough game. Leeds are a really dangerous side and I’m just really happy to come away with the win.“I wanted us to stay patient. I thought for major of periods of the second half we didn’t touch the ball at times and they edged themselves in front. We were trying to score every two minutes – I just wanted them to be patient.“To then finish the way we did was great. Danny played a massive part in that and it was outstanding for a young kid to kick the goal and then the field goal.”He continued: “I thought our game management in the end was outstanding and that’s pleasing because you’ve got to win in all different fashions. That should give us a lot of confidence knowing we can be behind and finish the game off like that.“Danny is a confident young fella; he would have expected to kick both and he did.“You need that in all your players and in particular in half backs. They’re going to be the big play moment type players, like the clutch players of basketball. You need them to deliver and he did that tonight.”last_img read more

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BCC hopes to attract more metalworking students with new accreditation

first_img BCC president Susanne Adams says the National Institute for Metalworking Skills or “NIMS” accreditation means that metalworking students will now graduate with a certificate of excellence.For the industries that hire them, it is essentially a guarantee that these individuals have the skills to do the job.Adams says the school saw the need for metalworkers in the area, and worked together with local businesses in the industry to make this accreditation happen.Related Article: Proposal to replace campus police with Brunswick County deputies“It was a collaboration between Brunswick Community College, as well as with our local industries telling us that they have a need for good metal workers in our area. And of course the top of that is to become NIMS certified,” said Adams.Chad Yaw, Director of Operations for Quick Release Pins & Accessories or “QRP” in Lelad hopes this will bring more skilled workers to the industry.“Having NIMS as part of the Brunswick County Community College system will now hopefully attract more students from the high schools into this program. Too often we’re pushing students into a college bound career,” said Yaw.Adams says part of becoming NIMS certified means industry workers actually inspect and evaluate the products that are made by students.BCC is now one of three schools in the Southeast Prosperity Zone that is NIMS accredited, and one of ten statewide. Brunswick County Community College has received an important accreditation that is good news for both the school and local industry.(Photo: Matt Bennett/WWAY) LELAND, NC (WWAY) —  Big news for an area college on Thursday. Brunswick County Community College received an important accreditation that is good news for both the school and local industry.There was a feeling of excitement in the air at BCC as staff, students, and representatives of the local metalworking industry celebrated this big achievement.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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VIDEO TRex conducts Pender school band performance

first_img They say, “here at Pender County Schools, we are truly an equal opportunity employer – men, women, dinosaurs. you know, the usual.” Dinosaur conducts 6th grade band (Photo: Surf City Middle School) PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The Pender County school district stepped back in time, way back, to make sure all employees have equal opportunities on the job.With tongue firmly in cheek, Pender County Schools shared this video on their Facebook page of the Surf City Middle School 6th grade band being conducted by — a dinosaur!- Advertisement – last_img read more

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